Harder than it looks!

In my last post I wrote about tuning up my spinning wheel.  Since then, I have attempted to make it do its thing!  I used the wool I was given for Christmas.IMG_20151227_112724874

At first it didn’t go to well.  It kept breaking.  After an hour and a half-this is all I accomplished.IMG_20151228_132925846

This pile of broken tangled bits on the floor was greater than the finished bit on the wheel.IMG_20151228_140818292

But, then suddenly it started to click and in 20 minutes, I doubled my production.IMG_20151228_140447946

It is much thicker (and lumpier) than I hoped-especially if I ply it together to a 2 or three ply skein.  It would be stronger if I do but it will lose its distinct color changes so I might not do that.  There is a style of plying called Navajo (several videos on YouTube explaining how) that might not mess up the variegation as much.

The tricky part that I have to figure out….now I’m getting ahead of myself.  I need to concentrate on getting the one ply done before I figure out what I’m going to do next with it!  I do need more bobbins though…off to eBay….

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Wheel tune up

I spent my Christmas Sunday tuning up my spinning wheel.

I got it cleaned up.

I got it cleaned up.

Re-glued some of the joints.  I had to rig up a clamping system because none of my clamps were long enough.

Re-glued some of the joints. I had to rig up a clamping system because none of my clamps were long enough.

I got the wheel and whorls strung properly so that the bobbin and  fly wheels spin at different speeds...as they should.  And I got the bobbin and orifice primed.

I got the wheel and whorls strung properly so that the bobbin and fly wheel spin at different speeds…as they should. And I got the bobbin and orifice primed.

I put a drop of sewing machine oil on the moving parts.

I put a drop of sewing machine oil on the moving parts.

Tomorrow, I try spinning this!

Tomorrow, I try spinning this!

 

Year in review

I don’t know how many of my readers actually care for a recap but I find them motivating.  One tends to forget how much gets made in a year and one wonders where the motivation will come for next year.  Seeing it all in one place gives me a feel good moment and a push to strive for next year.  So here it is…

Work projects: a hand painted poster.photo

Accessories:

photo 2

 

Added some frills to an already existing bustle.

Added some frills to an already existing bustle.

Added trim to the bottom of this skirt.

Added trim to the bottom of this skirt.

Added a buckle to an existing mantle.

Added a buckle to an existing mantle.

Padded cap for a helmet.

Padded cap for a helmet.

chainmail coif

chain mail coif

Knitted projectsphoto 1

A cowl that I have since lost.  Bummer

A cowl that I have since lost. Bummer

photo

Beaded bag

Beaded bag

Another beaded bag.

Another beaded bag.

IMG_20151109_065258429

A work bag for my knitting

A work bag for my knitting

A costume for a friend.

A costume for a friend.

Fingerless mitts for a friend.

Fingerless mitts for a friend.

And fingerless mitts for myself.

And fingerless mitts for myself.

Full ensembles:SAM_2714

SAM_3358

The full ensembles are actually 5 projects in one: the bags which I showed in detail above, the bodices, the skirts, the over-skirts and the hats.  So all in all, a productive year!

I think my next year in review will be on the costumed events my tiny group indulged in.

Merry Christmas to me

I ran out and bought myself a Christmas gift this weekend.  Hey, who knows me and what I like better than me!  I saw a spinning wheel at a flea market a few weeks ago.  I haven’t stopped thinking about it so after a bit of wheeling and dealing (pun intended) I went home with this…IMG_20151220_161433258

It is called a Spin-well Spinning WheelIMG_20151220_161426921

For a long version of its history I send you this well written blog post.  The condensed version is it was made in my part of Canada during the 1930’s to 50’s and was based on Ukrainian wheels.  It was known as the Sifton wheel (the town it was made) or the Spin-Well or Well-Made wheels (company names).

Before I try spinning on this, it needs a bit of a clean up.IMG_20151220_161441409

And I think some of the bolts need some tightening so that it isn’t so wobbly.  At least I hope the bolts will help and that I wont need to get some carpenters glue on the other joints….IMG_20151220_161505634

 

Some more research was not amiss.  I could find information on other wheels and I could figure out what part was comparable and thus how they should work but one part I had trouble figuring out was the tension adjuster.  Does it even have one?  Low and behold I found this blog that showed it did have one in the back behind the gear thingys and it also showed that the flea market seller didn’t have the wheel “strung” properly and so I will need to get another drive belt.  I will also have to learn the correct terminology for this machine.  I can’t keep calling the parts “thingys”

 

Historical Sew Monthly 12: Redo

 

What the item is: fingerless gloves.IMG_20151214_225806410

The Challenge: Redo: brown, practical accessory and silver screen.  Basically, I repeated the pattern that I did for silver screen but I did it in brown.  The green pair was given away as a Christmas gift.IMG_20151206_093131565

Fabric:wool

Pattern: 18th century mitts as adapted here.

Year:18th century to  early 19th

Notions: 5 double point needles.

How historically accurate is it?: Very!  My wool was probably a bit thicker than what they used.   95%?

Hours to complete: About 20

First worn: not yet

Total cost: $16

Historical Monthly 2016

Historical Monthly 2016 is up now and I have my plans worked out now.  Some I’m more excited about than others but all will be useful at some point so here goes nothing!

January –  Procrastination – finish a garment you have been putting off. The mantle I started but got stalled on because it is ugly and I didn’t need it is the project for this. Perhaps some short fingerless gloves, using the left over wool from the long ones I made this year. 

February – Tucks & Pleating – make a garment that features tucks and pleating.  I need more than one chemise so that is the plan.

March – Protection – make something to protect yourself from weather.  One of my pals has found reference and patterns to winter head gear called a Canadian cloud.  I may make arm warmers as well.

April – Gender-Bender make an item for the opposite gender.  I’ve been wanting to make a gambeson for my son.

May – Holes –  Make a garment that is about holes.  Crotchless bloomers definitely have holes and I can use one more pair.

June – Travel – make a garment for travelling, or inspired by travel.  I will be traveling to the Dickens’ Festival again and a knitted Tulma would not be amiss.

July – Monochrome – make a garment in black, white, or any shade of grey in between. I’ve been a very unfinished woman walking around with no cap upon my head, begging dirt and lice and cold to take me an my hair to task!

August – Pattern – make something in pattern, the bolder and wilder the better. The paisley I bought at the Dickens’ Festival fits this description for sure!

September – Historicism – Make a historical garment that was itself inspired by the fashions of another historical period. Want to make Victorian leather gloves that hint back to the 1700’s.  I haven’t worked with leather in ages so this will be a challenge for me!

October – Heroes – Make a garment inspired by your historical costuming hero.  Most of my costuming heroes have made corsets that are functional.  My one attempt wasn’t very functional or authentic.

November – Red – Make something in any shade of red. I think a red knitted petticoat would be fun.

December – Special Occasion: make something for a special occasion historically.  Long silk gloves were in order for balls and formal dinners.  If I am really ambitious, they will be embroidered.