A goal…not a resolution

Have any of you made new years resolutions?  I tend not to do those any more.  They never make it past January.   But I do have a couple of goals.  One is to reduce the amount of stuff in my house.  I used to go through the house twice a year and ditch things that no longer served a purpose but I haven’t really done that in a few years and the amount of “stuff” that has started to amass is getting uncomfortable.

My other goal is along the lines of the first but more specific.  That is to reduce the sewing and knitting hoard by getting rid of started projects by either finishing them or getting rid of them.  So, for example, if I look in a bag and see a knitting project that I can honestly say I have no desire to finish, I will unravel the wool and either set it aside for another project or sell it in a garage sale or donate it to charity.  Some of that wool was purchased because it was on sale but now I feel it is ugly.

In terms of sewing, I’ve been hoarding fabric for 4 projects. Since I no longer do Historical Sew Monthly, I have no need to put these projects on the back burner AGAIN and run out and buy more fabric for projects that better suit the challenge.

Here are the four projects:

  1. The olive dress using fabric I bought a year and a half ago at CoCo.146
  2. A corset with fabric bought a year and a half ago (also at CoCo).147
  3. An 1896 dress with fabric I bought last spring for a Historical Sew Monthly challenge but never started.IMG_20170629_102241680
  4. Decide on and make a dress with the fabric my costuming buddy picked up for me when she went to CoCo last summer.IMG_20180104_073824267In years past, I worked out a project plan based on the Historical Sew Monthly challenges but this year I’m just saying “goals” not “plans” and I will tackle each project when I have completed a current project and I will decide on which one to start next based on what I feel like making.  Historical Sew Monthly was useful for helping me build my costume wardrobe and for pushing me into motion but now I don’t want the pressure.  I want to make what I want when I want.  I feel I can “up my game” not by rapidly trying new projects, eras and skills but by slowing down and working on quality not quantity.  I no longer need to build a wardrobe.  Now I need to fill it out with accessories and I need to start thinking about replacing dresses with ones that better represent what I know and what I can do.

Have any of you made plans or goals for this year?

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Ewe dressed as a lamb

I bought the fabric for my up coming dress.  It is for the HSF challenge “fashion plate” in which we are to use a fashion plate as inspiration.  This is the plate I chose.

ajaxhelper1The plan is to finally create something that I could wear with this shawl.SAM_1962

I needed about 10 meters of a blue or grey toned solid and about 2 meters of a pink toned patterned material.  And I needed it to be cheap.  I couldn’t find anything that matched those parameters but I did find an inexpensive pink solid and moderately price blue toned pattern. (Both are synthetic but to the untrained eye, are reasonable fakes.)

The pink is a ghastly shiny satin that screams “fake” but the wrong side is much more understated  and looks a bit like a silk dupioni (if you aren’t a fabric/textile expert.)

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The blue was likely intended for curtains but I think it goes well with the pink.

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I’m okay with the completed project being the opposite color scheme of the fashion plate.  It was intended to be inspiration only.  I do feel I have compromised on what I wanted with a dress that will be primarily pink.  To my thinking, pink is a young girls color.  I fear looking a bit like a ewe trying to be a lamb.  But, what the heck.  Never say never!  The fact that there is a saying like “ewe dressed as a lamb” means that some older women did (and do) dress in fashions meant for younger women.  I wont say older Victorian women NEVER wore pink.  And in fact, I can’t say I know for sure that the fashion police ever told older Victorian women not to wear pink.  I do know that pink for girls and baby blue for boys is the opposite of what was considered normal in Victorian times so my idea that “pink is for young people” may actually be a modern concept. If anyone out there knows for sure, please share!

PS I need a name for this dress so I can create a blog category for it. So far I am going with 1896 I Love Ewe