Ewe dressed as a lamb

I bought the fabric for my up coming dress.  It is for the HSF challenge “fashion plate” in which we are to use a fashion plate as inspiration.  This is the plate I chose.

ajaxhelper1The plan is to finally create something that I could wear with this shawl.SAM_1962

I needed about 10 meters of a blue or grey toned solid and about 2 meters of a pink toned patterned material.  And I needed it to be cheap.  I couldn’t find anything that matched those parameters but I did find an inexpensive pink solid and moderately price blue toned pattern. (Both are synthetic but to the untrained eye, are reasonable fakes.)

The pink is a ghastly shiny satin that screams “fake” but the wrong side is much more understated  and looks a bit like a silk dupioni (if you aren’t a fabric/textile expert.)

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The blue was likely intended for curtains but I think it goes well with the pink.

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I’m okay with the completed project being the opposite color scheme of the fashion plate.  It was intended to be inspiration only.  I do feel I have compromised on what I wanted with a dress that will be primarily pink.  To my thinking, pink is a young girls color.  I fear looking a bit like a ewe trying to be a lamb.  But, what the heck.  Never say never!  The fact that there is a saying like “ewe dressed as a lamb” means that some older women did (and do) dress in fashions meant for younger women.  I wont say older Victorian women NEVER wore pink.  And in fact, I can’t say I know for sure that the fashion police ever told older Victorian women not to wear pink.  I do know that pink for girls and baby blue for boys is the opposite of what was considered normal in Victorian times so my idea that “pink is for young people” may actually be a modern concept. If anyone out there knows for sure, please share!

PS I need a name for this dress so I can create a blog category for it. So far I am going with 1896 I Love Ewe

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