HSF 2017 Challenge 2 Remake Reuse Refashion

February’s challenge is done.  It is two months late but worth it!

The Challenge: 2 Remake Reuse Refashion

Material: Battenberg lace table cloth

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Pattern: TVE41  Plain Blousewaist

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Year: 1903

Notions: Bias tape, buttons, hooks and eyes

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How historically accurate is it? The pattern is good (thank you Truly Victorian for your dedicated work).  Linen was used as was Battenberg lace (though the lace was added after the shirt was assembled).  It is a vintage or older table cloth so the weave might be more accurate than a modern linen, but I am only guessing.  The color is good.  My buttons are plastic which is not ideal-possible but not common.  It is intended for day wear for my persona (upper middle class middle aged woman).  I think the silhouette is good.  Biggest problem is the corset-not the shirt itself. I give it about 85%.

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Hours to complete:  Not bad, once I got going.  I’d say about 30.

First worn: Not yet

Total cost: $15 for the table cloth, $5 for the buttons.

I’ve juggled around my projects and gave myself an easy one to work on next weekend.  That should get April’s challenge off my dance card.  Stay tuned.

 

UFO finished!

It must be nearly 2 years ago that I bought my little Spin Well spinning wheel.  I spun up some wool fairly quickly but got hung up on the plying.  I couldn’t figure out how to get my wheel to take up the wool onto the bobbin once it was plied.  Basically, I had to ply a strip of it and stop the wheel and turn the bobbin by hand.  I got hung up by the frustration.  (I tried looking on line.  Every video and blog spoke about different makes and models of wheels that had parts and doodads that my wheel does not.  I can’t find any reference to parts that my wheel is missing.) Anyway, if you are interested, here is a link to the posts about the wheel and my drama trying to get it to work.

Anyway, I finally knuckled down and finished that ball of wool.  It is thick and lumpy (which makes it very fashionable, by the way) but I am proud of it.IMG_20170404_095115310

It knit up quickly.IMG_20170405_083517651

I was hoping for a scarf but realistically, I knew it wasn’t very likely.  So I went with neck or ear warmer.

Wow!  Those photos really showcase the wrinkles and turkey waddle!  I probably need to start adding filters to my photographs!

HSM 2017 Challenge 3: The great outdoors

The Challenge: The great out doors

What the item is: knitted undersleeves

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Material: 100% wool yarn

Pattern: 1862 Petersons Nov issue knitted undersleeves

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Year: 1862

Notions: 4.5 mm knitting needles, darning needle

How historically accurate is it?: 80%.  Pattern is an original from the time and fiber content of the wool is correct. The color is plausible but I can’t speak to whether the dyes are accurate or whether the spinning technique is comparable to Victorian wool.  I used wood knitting needles so very true to form!  It is intended for winter wear for most occasions.  I believe all classes of women would wear this item. Both working women and would knit them so both would wear them.  The silhouette is a bit off when compared to the drawing.  I had to increase stitches and rows to get it to fit.  If I were to make them again, I would decrease the number of rows between the two puffs by 8 and add them back into the larger top puff.

Hours to complete: about 30

First worn: not yet

Total cost:  balls of wool x $8=$24

Here is the pattern, in modern terms, enlarged to fit a “stout” modern body, with the changes I mention above (that should improve the shape).  To get the best fit the number of cast on stitches you need is the number you would need to go around the widest part of your fore arm.  The number of rows, in total is the number you would need to go from the widest part of your upper arm to your wrist, with extra added to create the puffs.

Worsted weight wool.  One ball of white, two balls of main color. 4.5 mm knitting needles. With the exception of the ribbing at the top, the whole thing is done in the knit stitch only.

Cast on 52 stitches with the white wool.

Knit 14 rows.

Switch to the main color and knit 26 rows.

Slip one stitch onto the right needle and pick up the first of the cast on stitches.  Slip the second stitch onto the needle and pick up the second cast on stitch.  Continue in this fashion until all the stitches and all the cast on stitches have been transferred to the right hand needle.

Transfer all the stitches back to the left hand needle. Add the white wool (you can leave the brown still attached) and knit 2 together across all the stitches.  Knit one more row in white.

Leave the white attached and pick up the brown wool.  Knit two rows in brown.

Leave the brown attached and pick up the white wool.  Knit two rows in white.  Break off the white and tie it off.

Knit 17 rows in brown.

Switch to white.  Knit 14 rows.

Switch to brown.  Knit 26 rows.

Slip one stitch onto the right needle and pick up the first of the white stitches in the block of white.  Slip the second stitch onto the needle and pick up the second of the white stitches in the block of white.  Continue in this fashion until all the stitches and all the stitches of the first row of the block of white have been transferred to the right hand needle.

Transfer all the stitches back to the left hand needle. Add the white wool (you can leave the brown still attached) and knit 2 together across all the stitches.  Knit one more row in white.

Leave the white attached and pick up the brown wool.  Knit two rows in brown.

Leave the brown attached and pick up the white wool.  Knit two rows in white.  Break off and tie off the white.

In brown, *knit one stitch and increase 1 stitch in each of the next two*.  *Repeat across the row*. Knit 52 rows in brown.

Switch to white and knit 2 together across the row.  To create the ribbing, knit 1 purl 1 across the row.  Next row, purl 1 knit 1 across the row.  Repeat until the cuff is 26 rows long. Cast off LOOSELY.

Sew the two side edges to create a tube.  If the ribbing is too loose, I think you could add elastic or a cording without messing with the authenticity too much.  In 1820 elastic was patented for use in clothing.

 

 

I finished the impulse buy

I saw some wool about a month ago that called to me.  It was variegated in colors I associate with old Hudson’s Bay blankets.  It kept calling to me but I steadfastly ignored it and followed my “no new wool till I finish what is in my stash” rule. (Following this rule got easier after going through a funk because no one wanted what I was making.)

But the wool called to me for a few weeks and I decided I could make something that I want with it.  I decided to make a throw for my living room.  The dog uses the one currently there as an extra bed on the couch.  Talk about Princess.  Needless to say, I’m not inclined to offer it to guests who may wish a cozy cover while watching TV.

For the most part I am pleased with it.  The wool is chunky so it made up fast and I used a single crochet stitch for the whole thing so it was a no brain power require project.  It needs to be blocked and it probably could have used a chain stitch or two in the corners to make it lay flatter but I didn’t want holes.

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My Princess on her bed.

The colors and boxes match my carpet perfectly.

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You can really see the need for blocking in this photo!  It is just so big and heavy as it is that I’m not excited about trying to deal with blocking…

These are the colors that drew me to it.

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Now I should get to work on historical projects…which is what this blog is supposed to be about!

HSF 2017: challenge 1 First and Last

Well, this is a tad late!  Three and a half weeks late!  But as you know, December and January was totally messed up for me with stress at work, two car accidents (neither my fault), dealing with the devil (ie insurance company) and car shopping. My project for this month is a total cheat so, baring any disasters, should be done on time.
The Challenge: First and Last. This is a Victorian Chemise and this would be the first thing someone would put on.

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Material: cotton (possibly a blend…it has been in my stash for ages, I don’t remember its content.)

Pattern: Laughing Moons Victorian undies.

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Year: The package is listed as Victorian so I will go with 1836-1901.

Notions: lace (my stash only had poly stuff and this is a stash busting year) 2 buttons.

How historically accurate is it? So-so. The definite and possible synthetic fibers are bad. The pattern is okay I believe. I machine sewed which would be bad if the goal was for the earlier end of the Victorian era. As far as the persona I costume for (upper middle class older lady who is a bit on the conservative side) the style and amount of trim would be appropriate. So I give it a grade of 60%

Hours to complete: 10 which is more than it should. I just couldn’t do the mental aerobics required to attach the yoke so that the hand stitching that covers the seam was on the inside. I had to do it 3 times! I’ve made this pattern before! So annoyed with myself!

First worn: not yet

Total cost: Nothing. I used a pattern I had used before and I used material left over from a petticoat that I way over estimated the fabric needs. The lace and buttons were also stash, either given to me or salvaged from other sources.

More modern sewing: repairs addition

This past long weekend has been a productive one.  I did quite a bit of crocheting (nothing finished yet) and sewing. I completed (finally) HSF’s January challenge and some modern sewing/repairs.

I have a shirt I really like except that it is too low cut and my bra is fully visible to the world.  This means I’ve had to wear a camisole under it.  This is fine except I work in a nursing home where the heat is set a tad high for the comfort of the seniors and I have my own personal midlife internal tropical heat waves happening.  An extra layer of clothing is not desirable!  (I stopped wearing my corset daily because of the combined reasons of the start of hot flashes and the cessation of chronic back pain.)  This weekend, I fixed the problem by sewing in a chunk of lace into the neckline of the shirt.  Easy fix.

I also have a pair of pants that I LOVE except the zipper wouldn’t stay up.  I tried to fix it by using pliers to squeeze the slide tighter but ended up breaking it right off.  This meant I had to either pitch the pants or fix the zipper.  Zippers are the devil but I am pleased to say I successfully replaced it!

Finally, I have three sarongs that I wear on the beach.  I can wrap them around my chest or waist and tie them off like a bath towel but I’d like to do the style where you wrap it around yourself and tie it behind your neck.  But my sarongs don’t have enough material.img_20170220_113324807_hdr.jpg

I’m short by at least half a meter.img_20170220_113330863.jpg

When I last went fabric shopping, I was hoping to find a fabric that would suit for a sarong.  No luck.  So how to make the ones I have work?  Add ribbon along one edge.img_20170220_132104805.jpg

With this added ribbon, I can still wear the sarong in the styles I was able to before, just with an added bow decoration.img_20170220_120357463.jpg

And I discovered another way I could wear it with the added ribbon.img_20170220_130446505.jpg

All in all, a productive weekend.  I wish I had 3 day weekends every week!

Next post will be about my completed HSF January project.

Marshall’s modern shirt

I finished my modern shirt today and I will wear it to work.  It is pretty comfy! I made a pattern from a stretchy shirt that I like the fit in the body…a bit snug but better than the boxy tent most t-shirts my size.  The alterations I made were, scoop neck not turtle, 3/4 length sleeve not full length and very long with slits on the side (like tops I’ve seen from India).  I went for the long option because I hate yanking down shirts that wont cover my tummy and I wanted one that covered my butt so that my stretchy pants would be slightly more suitable outside the gym (because I never go to the gym).

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Please excuse the weird white spot my camera put on my face.  I have no idea what that is!

The shirt is called the Marshall’s shirt because that is where I bought the fabric last Saturday.

The photo on the right is a more true reflection of the color.

I probably could wear some sort of tummy control with this shirt but other than that, I am pretty pleased with it.  I would do this again.  I have enough fabric left over for a tank top I think.  May be even a sleeveless mini dress.  So bang for the buck: I spent less on making this top and a future tank top than I would buying new ones. (Almost 3/4’s of the money spent was on the trim but DANG it is pretty…so worth it.)  And unlike store bought shirts it is totally to my specifications. Most store bought shirts I own have some thing I wish was different. It would still be cheaper to buy used but thrift shopping can be hit and miss.