So pleased with my nerdy self!

I sometimes like to play the computer game Sims.  When the kids were little, it was bordering on an obsession.  In fact one of the reasons we now have 5 computers in a 4 person house is everyone got tired of me hogging the one and only computer to play Sims.

Things are a bit different now.  I’m not what you’d call an aficionado.  I haven’t run out and bought the latest version.  I still play Sims 3.  And these days, with Netflix in my life I go 6 months or more without playing and then I have a couple of weeks where I take it up again.

I’ve taken it up again.  I should be in the basement finishing my Edwardian shirtwaist but instead I am playing Sims.  But I simply must share this nerdy thing I did.  I built a Sims version of Dalnavert House Museum.  (Sorry for the wonky phone photos of a computer screen.  I couldn’t convince my computer to print screen properly).IMG_20170413_092902171_HDR

Okay, it isn’t exact.  I’m a bit limited by items available in my game.  Perhaps with a few more expansion packs I can get that roof right.SAM_2871

After I finished the house I made a “mini me”.  Then I used a cheat and made myself rich and then I bought the house and moved it!  Isn’t that great!  I can live “the dream” at least in the Sims world.  Which is why I like Sims.  Here is a world I actually do control.

Here is “mini me” in the dining room having cereal.

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Here I am walking around the study. And then reading a book at Hugh John’s desk!

And now I’m in the lady’s sun room.

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Some of the floor plan in the servants area is off.  I obviously didn’t have an actual floor plan to work with but, hey, it’s just the servants wing after all.

 

 

 

 

A night on the town

Shirley and I launched our costuming season last night by attending a musical evening at our/my favorite house museum, Dalnavert House.

The featured band was Simpson’s Folly.

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Shirley and I dressed up in some 1890’s ensembles in honor of the house’s age.IMG_20170408_200811727

I don’t know why my hair looks so “slept in” in that photo!  Isn’t the cane Shirley is carrying fabulous!  She says the vendor she bought hers from has an elephant one!  I think I need that!

Simpson’s folly had a quiz question about a young private that came to Manitoba in the 1870’s to deal with the upstart Riel.  He later became a premier in Manitoba…who was it? Shirley thought it was the builder of Dalnavert House, Hugh John McDonald.  She was too shy to answer the quiz in case she was wrong.

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I was fairly sure she wasn’t.  I remembered hearing that he had been involved with the fight against Riel but couldn’t remember much about his political past.  I took a chance that Shirley had remembered that part correctly and answered for her.  (When it comes to talking I don’t have much fear of looking the fool.  I think I actually need a bit more fear.)

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We won a CD from the band!  Nice launch to our costuming season!

 

Merry Christmas!

I want to wish you all a fabulous Holiday!  I’m enjoying what works out to be a 4 day weekend and  I intend to spend most of it in my PJ’s!  Woot Woot!

I thought you might enjoy some inspiration that I got from the local house museum Dalnavert.

The Origin of the Christmas Tree by Heather Mousseau

In 1841 Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, husband of Queen Victoria, imported a small Christmas tree from his homeland and the fashion quickly caught on. Called German trees at first, they generally stood about 4 feet high and were placed on a table as we have done in the study at Dalnavert. They were decorated with small presents, sugared fruit or candy as we do in the cornucopias on our parlour tree, little toys, and other tiny items. Children might string garlands of cranberries or popped corn to trim their tree. They were lit by small wax tapers and must have looked quite lovely when all lit up.

As often happens, after being overwhelmed by the prep for an event, I find inspiration to add to my stress level for next time!  The above paragraph inspired me to have a bit of Victorian Christmas in my home.  This would mean having a 3rd tree!  I have my big tree with ornaments purchased or given over the years…many with sentimental meaning behind them.img_20161224_090726691.jpg

Then I have a little tree of elephant ornaments because I love elephants.img_20161224_090807821.jpg

This is the latest acquisition.

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Now I want a Victorian Tree.

To have this Victorian tree, I will need to find a 4 foot artificial tree. (1 step away from authentic but no need to kill a tree every year). I will scan the shelves this Boxing Day and see if the stores can produce one for a decent price.

The tree needs to be on a table, which I have.  The trouble is, that table already has decorations on it.

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These decorations will have to find a new home next year or be pitched into the donation bin.  Then I may have to move the table because the 4 foot tree might be a bit much on a 2 foot table in the middle of the room.

The small presents would be easy enough to do…make some ornaments with small doors in them to put small things in. I think I’ve seen a blog that has instructions for Victorian ornaments like that. The candied fruit…well I could learn to do that but likely I’ll take another step away from authenticity and by the fake ones.

I could give the cranberry popcorn chain thing a try again.  I did it once…and hung it up outside for the birds and squirrels.  (Don’t tell the hubby I feed the squirrels.  He hates them.)  The waxed tapers seems a bit like a fire hazard so I will take another step away from authenticity and see if I can find the battery operated kind and then come up with a way to attach them.  Perhaps glue some alligator clips on them…very authentic!

Then I will put the gifts for my costuming chums under it.  All wrapped in brown paper or tissue paper and tied with ribbon or lace.

Now the pragmatic part of me is saying, “yes, that seems like fun but, you didn’t put out all of the decorations this year (or last) because you didn’t feel like it.  What makes you think you’ll want to put out more next year?  And where will you put it hmmm?  And if you can’t find places for it all without resorting to little used rooms and step ladders…”

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“…what makes you think there will be room for it all when you DOWNSIZE in a year or two? And the idea of starting to collect those little Victorian buildings and creating a town is stupid.”

Oh shut up pragmatic side.  You are spoiling my muse.giphy

 

The missing outing

I have gone over and over my blog trying to find the outing that I wore my 1860’s Silky Skies dress.  I can’t find it.  So I’m hoping I am showing you new material and not boring you with a repeat!

According to Facebook, this event happened days after I started my new job which may explain the total brain fart that seems to have happened.  And according to these photos, I wore Silky Skies and Lottie wore her 1880’s ensemble.

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Shirley wore an 1850’s ensemble.

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It was a lovely summer day, perhaps a bit bright, so we took a lot of photos outside.

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It is cold and white out there so I am missing all those flowers!28

Before going inside, a nice fellow passed by and offered to take a group photo.39

Then it was inside to view all the pretty things.65

And learn a few things about our local history.51

I always find staircase photos fun!71

Perhaps I like them because I know how challenging it is with our modern stride to look graceful on stairs!

The no progress, progress post

For Historical Sew Monthly, the challenge this month is heroes. My project  is one that I learned about from a blogger known as Koshka or Katherine.   193

From her I heard of the Canadian Cloud or nubia.  So that was going to be my entry.  I chose a dreadfully thin wool so it is taking FOREVER to get anywhere with it!  img_20160828_115754412.jpg45 minutes per row!  It will be a miracle if it is finished this year, never mind this month.  On top of all that, I’m a bit bored with it.  This is a common problem for me…which explains why I have probably 30 unfinished knitting projects.

My thrum mitts are on hold as well.  img_20161002_152659041_hdr

I have come to the conclusion that I have been far to generous with my thrum bits and not only would the mitts be far too fat, I will not have enough to finish.  This means I need to rip out my progress, try to keep all the pieces from disintegrating and then make them smaller.  That seems no fun.  That sentiment = project on hold.

And I started a new project. I swear I didn’t buy this wool…a friend gave it to me!  I didn’t break my “no buying wool (unless…)” rule!img_20161025_092419725.jpg

The squares are knit on double point needles and the pattern reminds me of the bed cover I saw in one of our local house museums.

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7 Oaks House Museum

The squares on the above cover are larger so likely, they were made on regular needles and each square is made up of 4 triangles.

But, in spite of the fact that this project does not match any of the challenges and is not anything I actually need in my household or anything I could give as a gift, it is the thing I am most interested in doing.  That is probably because each row is different so I don’t get bored and because once each square is done, I feel like I have finished a project…immediate gratification.  Then I add it to the growing “Unnecessary Blanket”.img_20161025_092400500.jpgAnyone else have this project ADD problem?

Outing to the St. Boniface Museum

Shirley and I went to the St. Boniface Museum this weekend.  2It was my chance to wear something new and Shirley’s chance to wear something she hasn’t had enough opportunities to wear.62

For the most part, I was pleased with how the dress looks on but there were some issues with the jacket not sitting right.  I think the problem was the corset is the wrong era (and not small enough) so the “girls” were not smooth enough.5c

See how it rides up.

Before leaving home, I got the hubby to take an “at home” photo.1a

Corset cover required!  As well as a more appropriate corset!  The hoops need work too but I will acknowledge that they didn’t fall off this time, and I finally have them short enough that I don’t step on them (unless the ground is really hilly).

The St. Boniface Museum was built in 1847 and served many purposes.

1847 – 1956 Under the auspices of the Grey Nuns, the convent served as Western Canada’s first hospital, orphanage and seniors’ home. It was also a school, initially for both girls and boys; Louis Riel was a student here. Eventually, the Sisters operated a boarding school for girls.

Louis Riel was a Metis person (Aboriginal and French parents). 72

He was not pleased with how his people were being treated by the Canadian Government and he led a rebellion that set up a provisional government which ultimately started what became the province of Manitoba.  He is now known and honored as the founder of my province but at the time, the ruling class were not pleased with his actions and he and his supporters were imprisoned and he was hung.  Canada is a great country but it has some ugly skeletons in its closet…the treatment of the aboriginal people is one.

Because of his connection to the convent, many artifacts of his life and death are preserved in the museum.  There is also many artifacts related to the Metis peoples…7a

…and, of course the Catholic Church in Manitoba.  13

The nuns who ran and used the building for a century are represented as well.

Different displays were set up to represent Victorian and Edwardian rooms.  (It really is a big place!)  33

I loved the dishes from the above table and the nut cracker on the near by side board.

They had several nice examples of spinning wheels that makes me think I need to get back on mine!11

Shirley and I had fun trying to photograph ourselves in the mirrors.

 

When I got home, I played with my phone app and made a few special pictures just for the heck of it.44a

Mosquitos and graves: Little Britain Church

I went on an outing this weekend with my good costuming bud, Shirley.  This time we went to a little church called Little Britain Church.00

Shirley wore her new 1886 Butter Scotch dress.  Great colors!14

I wore my 1873 Purple Polonaise.8

Will they let us in, do you think?11

The original church from the 1850’s is gone now.  The current building (which is still in use) was built in the 1870’s.20There are graves from the 1850’s up to today.2864

We walked along the river which was an infested breeding ground for mosquitos.  All the layers of clothes were a blessing except the only exposed flesh they could get at was our faces!53

Shirley and I seem to have a bit of a problem with staying in character!

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And sometimes we are just silly!