Cute!

I came across a pair of boots at the Costume Museum (possibly for the second time) and I just had to blog about them (possibly for the second time).  They are just so DANG cute!IMG_20180710_184815942

I see little shoes like these and I want to pinch the baby’s cheeks.  But that little baby is long gone.  Even if it lived to a ripe old age, it is long gone by now. I don’t know the year.  If I were to guess…1890’s because I’ve seen similar (but larger) ones in the collection that were dated 1890’s.

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Button buys

It was a whirlwind weekend with lots of action that made it fly by.  On Saturday I had an orientation so that I can start volunteering officially at Dalnavert Museum later on in the month.  After that I went to a gathering for my nephews who have started a heavy metal band and were wanting to play in front of people.  Though it sounded like noise to me, I did appreciate the skill required and could see how people who like that crap music would like it.  Then there was supper at an out door café.  It was too hot for me (36 Celsius  98 Fahrenheit) and I couldn’t eat.  All I could do was pray it would be over soon.  Sunday was church, lunch at my sister-in-laws and then the kids and their significant others joined us for dinner and a games night.  Whew! busy!

It all started off on Friday night when my costuming buds and I met at the costume museum’s button sale.  As a volunteer, I was able to pre shop and I came home with quite the haul!  Shirley, Lottie and I went for coffee afterwards and ooo’d and awed over each others scores.  This is what I got…

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Three large brass buttons

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6 smaller matching buttons

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8 metal buttons

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1 Blurry close up.

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16 matching metal buttons

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Less blurry close up

A jar of bone buttons.

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A tea cup full of buttons. In this case, I was more interested in the tea cup than the buttons.

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Ooooo!

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Meh.

For the find of the day….

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A box of jet buttons.

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Very few match.

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But there is a few pairs.

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And some are close enough that from far away, they’d be fine.

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Some weren’t jet but I still liked them anyway!

Blue turn of the century suit

The last item from the last Costume Museum of Canada display in May that I will be showing is a turn of the century blue suit.

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The detail on it is wonderful!

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The chevron pattern is repeated on the back.

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there is green velvet trim on the collar…

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…and sleeve.

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The buttons are blue velvet.

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I wouldn’t put blue and green velvet together on one suit so I wonder if the buttons had been replaced at some point or there was some sort of weird fading on the collar and sleeve.  Still a nice suit.  For the display, it was paired up with a little bag.  And a broach was used to hide moth holes.

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Edwardian bike riding skirt

The Costume Museum displayed several items attributed to Eaton’s department store at Dalnavert House Museum during Doors Open.  In previous posts I shared a turn of the century coat and an Edwardian skirt and jacket outfit.  This is how they looked on display.

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This post will be about a bicycle riding skirt.

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The front of the skirt has two rows of buttons, one running down each side.  The buttons on the right side of the picture (left side of the skirt) function as the closure for the skirt and as the means of holding the front panel shut when walking.

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When wanting to ride a bike, the front panel was unbuttoned from the left side of the skirt and re buttoned onto the right side, thus “revealing” the split skirt.

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There was not much “revealing” of the split because the legs were very baggy so that they hung much like a skirt.  In fact the back of the skirt looks like a…well…a skirt!

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You really have to pull the legs apart to see that they are actually “pant legs” and not a skirt.

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The skirt was paired up with a little white shirt with delicate lace.

Some very cute boots and a hat were added to complete the look.

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Sunday at Doors Open: Dalnavert

During the Doors Open event in the last weekend of May, I had two costumes out.  The 1845 paisley “Atessa” dress and on the Sunday the 1903 Battenburg blousewaist (formally known as a table cloth) and the 1903 black trumpet skirt made an appearance.  I also added the Battenburg apron I found at a flea market which gave me a good “house keeper” kind of look.  This was ideal as I was doing some volunteer work at Dalnavert House.IMG_20180527_095918344

This was my first stint volunteering at the house and I really enjoyed it.  My volunteer roll for this event was primarily floating, giving rests to people who had assigned spots.  It gave me the chance to really get to know parts of the house.

After a busy day volunteering, I really was thirsty so a can of coke was like ambrosia!

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As I drank it, I remembered all kinds of Coke ads and memorabilia I have seen over the years so I “went with it”!

The modern hall attached to Dalnavert housed the Costume Museum’s display so I got to see the things I helped prepare.

Next post: more of the Costume Museum’s display!

Doors Open 2018: Ross House

Neither Lottie nor Shirley have seen Ross house and it had been some time since I had last seen it, so we decided to make that our second stop on our Doors Open outing.  1

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This little house was fairly grand in its day and was the first post office in the area.

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There were a few people from a group that is interested in the early Selkirk Settlers.

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Here are some of my favorite things in this little house.

There was a lovely lilac tree in bloom (my all time favorite flower) so I decided to take a picture of Lottie and Shirley and play with my photo app.

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It’s like I am Van Gogh!

At this point we were hot and hungry.  Our big plans for a picnic on the grounds disintegrated in favor of eating in my air conditioned car!  This proved a good move as it gave us the strength in see one more venue.  7 Oaks House.

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We have been to this house a few times. The little porch is nice.

If only I could draw…(wink wink…)

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I liked the door bell.  You pull down on the lever…

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…and the bell on the other side rings.

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Just inside the door is this holder with this nice parasol/umbrella with the metallic handle.

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I had been chatting with a friend on Facebook and we were talking about our favorite dish patterns. We both had to look up photos of each others favorite. When I walked into the room of the house, there was the pattern my friend had mentioned! I hope she gets to the house to see it for herself!

Next post will be about how I spent my Sunday for Doors Open.

Doors Open 2018: Kildonan Cemetery and Church

In the past few years, I have volunteered at the old jail for Doors Open.  This year I decided to change it up.

On the Saturday my costume group, Truly Victorian, went to 3 venues.  And on Sunday I volunteered at Dalnavert House museum.

The cemetery and church was the first stop.  Lottie and I went in 1840’s attire and Shirley was in later styles.  3 2

Of course when one goes to an old cemetery, one wants to see old graves.

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There are the sad ones of dead babies.

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The ones that reveal family tragedies.

The above stone shares of one man’s losses. His 24 year old wife died Feb 21, 1890.  Six days later, their daughter died at only 45 days old.  4 years prior, they lost a 12 day old baby girl.

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There are the stones that make you angry. Like this repaired one. There were several like this that possibly fell victim to vandals.

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And there are the ones that are creative and beautiful.

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The church, built in 1852, is under restoration at this time but we were allowed to go in and see it.

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The balcony was off limits as it is no longer safe.  But the main floor, in spite of needing a little TLC is in good shape. b

The stain glass, which was added in the 1920’s, was my favorite.

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And of the 4 of them, this was my favorite both in terms of the picture itself and because I recognize the Henderson name as I lived a few blocks from a street named after that family.  And on Henderson, there is a church named after the pastor that originally founded this church, John Black.

When we were done looking at the interior of the church, we walked around the exterior to see the work that had been done.

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On the right side of the photo you see the west side wall still covered in stucco. The left side of the photo shows the north wall with the stucco removed and the tyndall stone revealed.

For those of you who liked to be a bit grossed out, I have to show you what I saw next to the door on my way out of the church.

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Dozens of Lady Bugs.

I used to like Lady Bugs but last year they introduced an Asian variety to our city in hopes of controlling aphids.  Those little devils bite.  I can’t tell if these are the Asian ones or the nice kind but even the nice kind are gross in huge bunches!