Where was I?

In my last post I shared the photos of my completed Olive Dress.  What I didn’t tell you was where I was when those photos were taken.  I was actually an unpaid extra in a movie about the 1919 General strike in Winnipeg that became a very prominent event in the history of Canada. 30 thousand workers from many classes and ethnic groups came together and marched and basically shut down the whole city.  The strike was so effective that the Canadian government (for fear that there would be sympathetic strikes across the country) became involved and the leaders were arrested.

The scenes I and the other extras were involved in were the street marches and the rush of deputized RCMP’s on horseback who were sent in to break up the strike. This resulted in several injuries and one death.

Three perks to the event…

  1. New life experience to add to my memories.  Not a bucket list thing but pretty cool non the less.  I wonder if this film will ever move beyond film festivals to a venue I might actually see it.39976357_2194916177204057_72800769409024000_o
  2. I found a person that might actually buy some of my costumes off of me.  I have about 3 that I’m not really in love with anymore and if I made something that I liked better, I’d be happy to part with them.
  3. I actually got offered a job.  It is to work as a casual seamstress in the costume department.  The deal is that if a production requires more costumes than the costume department can crank out, they will call on casuals to step in an help out.  The money could be quite good, and according the person I spoke to, they always need help.  Since I’ve never sewed for other people, this is a daunting thought!  I’m curious enough to want to ask more questions but scared enough to believe that I wont go for it.39953553_2194288170600191_7851649054055333888_n

I wish I had some more photos to share with you but something went screwy with my camera and I lost all my photos.

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Few of my favorite things: Sir John A MacDonald’s clock

In the study at Dalnavert Museum there is a clock on the mantle.

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Dalnavert was built by Hugh MacDonald, the only surviving son of Sir John A MacDonald, first Prime Minister of Canada.

There only a few pieces in the museum that belonged to the family (most of the original items in the house were auctioned off after Hugh died and his wife sold and moved out).  The clock on the mantle is a MacDonald family heirloom.

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It was once in Hugh’s father’s office.  I’ve been up close to an item owned by the first Prime Minister of Canada.  So cool!

Doors Open 2018: Kildonan Cemetery and Church

In the past few years, I have volunteered at the old jail for Doors Open.  This year I decided to change it up.

On the Saturday my costume group, Truly Victorian, went to 3 venues.  And on Sunday I volunteered at Dalnavert House museum.

The cemetery and church was the first stop.  Lottie and I went in 1840’s attire and Shirley was in later styles.  3 2

Of course when one goes to an old cemetery, one wants to see old graves.

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There are the sad ones of dead babies.

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The ones that reveal family tragedies.

The above stone shares of one man’s losses. His 24 year old wife died Feb 21, 1890.  Six days later, their daughter died at only 45 days old.  4 years prior, they lost a 12 day old baby girl.

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There are the stones that make you angry. Like this repaired one. There were several like this that possibly fell victim to vandals.

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And there are the ones that are creative and beautiful.

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The church, built in 1852, is under restoration at this time but we were allowed to go in and see it.

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The balcony was off limits as it is no longer safe.  But the main floor, in spite of needing a little TLC is in good shape. b

The stain glass, which was added in the 1920’s, was my favorite.

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And of the 4 of them, this was my favorite both in terms of the picture itself and because I recognize the Henderson name as I lived a few blocks from a street named after that family.  And on Henderson, there is a church named after the pastor that originally founded this church, John Black.

When we were done looking at the interior of the church, we walked around the exterior to see the work that had been done.

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On the right side of the photo you see the west side wall still covered in stucco. The left side of the photo shows the north wall with the stucco removed and the tyndall stone revealed.

For those of you who liked to be a bit grossed out, I have to show you what I saw next to the door on my way out of the church.

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Dozens of Lady Bugs.

I used to like Lady Bugs but last year they introduced an Asian variety to our city in hopes of controlling aphids.  Those little devils bite.  I can’t tell if these are the Asian ones or the nice kind but even the nice kind are gross in huge bunches!

 

Lunch at McLeod House

My good friend and her husband are in town and we met for lunch at McLeod House.

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It would make a nice little outing for my costume crew.  The food was fabulous!  You must try the chicken salad sandwich and the cheese cake!  The main floor is where the kitchen and eating areas are and the top floor is a gift shop.  Though there is not a lot of period furniture and the kitchen and bathrooms are modern (as I believe they have to be to serve food) the “bones” of the house still have that old feeling.

There isn’t a lot of photo ops like Maple Grove Tea House had (I do miss that place) but there is shopping in and near the McLeod House.

Down the street is a gifts and antique shop where I saw this cool thing!

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A paper dress form called the…

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Adjust-o-matic dress form.  It looked to be in mint condition and was from the mid 1960’s.

Not my era but still pretty cool!

Video from the last outing

The event was officially launched with a flag raising, which I have a nice little video of but WordPress insists on playing it upside down…I wont torment you with that.

The event was then blessed in traditional aboriginal fashion.  The video is fairly long (but up side up). I  found the music very moving!  Much more powerful in person than on video.

The event being celebrated featured the local aboriginal tribes and the Scottish settlers so some Scottish music was shared as well.  I find the pipes moving as well!  But that is just my Scottish blood speaking! This video has the still sideways but it in fact plays upside up!  Sigh!

Don’t Feed the bears

I’ve been 2 months in my new job now.  If ever there was a sign from God that I had made a good move this is it.  Shortly after my arrival, I learned that my new work space was celebrating 100 years as a hospital (the land had held a hunting lodge, hotel and mansion in various stages of its history).  It became a hospital during the first world war and is now a hybrid facility with a personal care home, rehab hospital, day hospital and some medical things like labs and x-ray facilities.   In celebration, the Costume Museum of Canada was invited to put on its Heritage Fashion Review, which has models wearing near perfect replicas of items in the collection.  (It was like God was saying “You fit here.  You belong here.”)

In spite of volunteering with the Museum for years, I haven’t actually seen the show yet.  Lucky me!  As part of my job, I had to take down, and sit with, some of the residents that are living in the personal care home section so that they could see the show.  Basically, I got paid to see a show I’ve wanted to see for years!

In honor of the show, staff were encouraged to dress up in their favorite decade from the last 100 years.  For me that would have to be the years closest to the Victorian era, obviously. But, I don’t have anything from 1916…closest I have is my 1901 widows weeds.  But, being a middle aged woman in war time, it wouldn’t be outside the realms of possibility that during a time of mourning, I pulled out my widows weeds and in the interest of frugality and war time shortages I wore it in spite of it being 15 years out of date.

The other reason it is perfect is because of the sign over the gift shop where I work.img_20160930_153303099_hdr

The gift shop is called the Dancing Bear gift shop.  I can’t find proof for this but I believe the photograph is connected to the location of my work space.  Perhaps when it was a hotel?  In addition to the gift shop there is a bar called Chad’s Bar.  It is an actual pub for the patients and residents in the building.  (The name Chad is also connected to the history of the land, I believe)  And next to the entrance to the bar is a stuffed bear.

This was my photo op!img_20160930_153444423

All in all, a good day!

 

Outing to the St. Boniface Museum

Shirley and I went to the St. Boniface Museum this weekend.  2It was my chance to wear something new and Shirley’s chance to wear something she hasn’t had enough opportunities to wear.62

For the most part, I was pleased with how the dress looks on but there were some issues with the jacket not sitting right.  I think the problem was the corset is the wrong era (and not small enough) so the “girls” were not smooth enough.5c

See how it rides up.

Before leaving home, I got the hubby to take an “at home” photo.1a

Corset cover required!  As well as a more appropriate corset!  The hoops need work too but I will acknowledge that they didn’t fall off this time, and I finally have them short enough that I don’t step on them (unless the ground is really hilly).

The St. Boniface Museum was built in 1847 and served many purposes.

1847 – 1956 Under the auspices of the Grey Nuns, the convent served as Western Canada’s first hospital, orphanage and seniors’ home. It was also a school, initially for both girls and boys; Louis Riel was a student here. Eventually, the Sisters operated a boarding school for girls.

Louis Riel was a Metis person (Aboriginal and French parents). 72

He was not pleased with how his people were being treated by the Canadian Government and he led a rebellion that set up a provisional government which ultimately started what became the province of Manitoba.  He is now known and honored as the founder of my province but at the time, the ruling class were not pleased with his actions and he and his supporters were imprisoned and he was hung.  Canada is a great country but it has some ugly skeletons in its closet…the treatment of the aboriginal people is one.

Because of his connection to the convent, many artifacts of his life and death are preserved in the museum.  There is also many artifacts related to the Metis peoples…7a

…and, of course the Catholic Church in Manitoba.  13

The nuns who ran and used the building for a century are represented as well.

Different displays were set up to represent Victorian and Edwardian rooms.  (It really is a big place!)  33

I loved the dishes from the above table and the nut cracker on the near by side board.

They had several nice examples of spinning wheels that makes me think I need to get back on mine!11

Shirley and I had fun trying to photograph ourselves in the mirrors.

 

When I got home, I played with my phone app and made a few special pictures just for the heck of it.44a